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Eat.Sleep.Txt.
By: Catie Moore

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How many texts messages have you sent today? How many of those text messages did you proof read before punching the green send button? How many times did you keep grammar and eloquent composition in mind when crafting your message?

If you're like most people the answers to these questions are: too many to count, zero, and zero. Texting is rampant among young smartphone users. According to a recent, Experian study, U.S. millenials-those texters ages 18-24-send and receive, on average, almost 4,000 texts per month...almost 50,000 texts per year.

SMS is a language filled with 'omgs' 'lols' and lack of punctuation, created to make communication via text more efficient in typing and responding. Along with shorter words, text messages are generally written as short bursts of information, rather than drawn out descriptive messages. Young smartphone users reading and writing nearly 50,000 texts per year are bound to pick up on sloppy writing habits.

The line between what is appropriate to text your BFF and what is appropriate language for an email to a future employer continuously blurs day by day. This leads to instances of informality when formality in communication is a must. Nothing screams "I don't care" more than implementing casual shorthand in a document or email where formal communication is needed to make a professional first impression.

Particular attention should be paid to grammar, spelling, and punctuation when crafting a business email. After all, an email is literally a text message often times created using a larger keyboard and monitor (although many access and utilize the mail function on their smartphones regularly) and is sent to an email address rather than a phone number. As email is often the preferred method of communication when applying for a job or an internship, setting up meetings with professors, or speaking with anyone with whom a personal relationship has not yet been established, it is important to take caution before hastily clicking the send mail button.

When applying for a job or an internship, it is imperative to present yourself with a professional demeanor, showing an employer your ability to reflect professionalism when communicating with clients. A job seeker should show how well spoken, professional, and qualified they are, not how quickly they can slap together and sent out an email. Your first e-mail is your first impression, making it your most important impression. Documents of such importance should be read, read again and read by another set of eyes to proof for short hand, misspelled words, and incorrect punctuation.

In a time when text messages rule the airwaves, be wary of the bad habits you could be developing that affect your formal written and verbal communication skills.

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Media Relations

What My Rabbit Taught Me About PR


By: Emily Clever

Rabbits are prey animals, and they’re hardwired to be elusive. Bonding with a pet rabbit takes intent, patience, energy and a handful of great ideas.

I’m not trying to degrade the wonderful men and women who follow their hearts as journalists by comparing the two, but regardless of species, building trust and a positive, fruitful relationship looks the same: Be purposeful. Be patient, yet dogged. Stay upbeat. Persevere. Think outside the box, which is an ironic statement intrinsically because it’s so clichéd.

I’ve had my rabbit, Moose, for only a few short months, but she has already managed to teach me so much about the world – and the world of PR. She’s taught me how to think like her (and that hiding behind the couch is not always an option). She’s taught me how far a good meal can go. She’s taught me the importance of being expressive, earnest, curious and respectful.

In this industry, when we reach out to media, we tend to sometimes forget these should-be guiding principles. It’s easy to default into the role of “pushy PR exec with an agenda.” It’s harder to engage, to listen, to ask the right questions, to consider what that journalist is working on or trying to accomplish, to actually be a source – a wellspring – of good ideas instead of a “me too”-type burden.

It’s also easy to chase the rabbit around the apartment and try to force it to like me, whereas it’s harder to learn to appreciate the rabbit and meet it on its level.

“I like to imagine my view of the world is always obscured by a tinted box,” writes Nathan Pyle in what I think is the most brilliant Buzzfeed article of all time. “I can’t see clearly because of this box. It is my own self-interest. Additionally, all of my experiences are like filters that fall into place and further obscure my vision. Everything I view is seen through this very unique set of filters.”

Of course, this is true of everyone … and every creature, too.

Next time you find yourself talking with someone – regardless of whether they’re a journalist, a business partner, a long-time friend, your spouse or your dog – try to see the world from their perspective just for a moment. You’ll be amazed at the results.
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The ‘Zoolander 2’ Announcement is So Hot Right Now

By Megan Burton



It’s 2015, and the PR industry is certainly changing. No, the press release still isn’t dead, but as our audiences’ news consumption habits and preferences evolve, brands must continue to explore fresh, creative ways to announce new products and share newsworthy content outside of the typical AP Style, inverted-pyramid structured press release of days past.

One such example comes from an unexpected source (which is kind of key, right?): actors Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson. In case you missed it, Stiller and Wilson hit the runway during Paris Fashion Week to announce the sequel of their 2001 film Zoolander:



Dressed as characters Derek Zoolander and Hansel, the actors strutted down the runway during the Valentino show, confirming the long-rumored and highly anticipated sequel. Paramount Pictures, the studio behind the upcoming film, further confirmed on Twitter. Absent from Paramount’s announcement? You guessed it: A press release. Instead, Paramount relied on Derek and Hansel to tell the story, with the help of social media, of course. The results have been unbelievable; a Google News search shows more than 6 million clips of the story in less than two days.

You may not have access to really, really, ridiculously good-looking celebrities or a high fashion runway, but you can be successful in sharing your unique message by thinking outside of the traditional-PR box, finding fresh ways to connect with your audience, and embracing social media. Don’t know where to start? We can help.

And no, Derek Zoolander still can’t turn left.

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social media experts are storytellers
At JDPR, we are storytellers.

One of my favorite questions to ask a client is, “What sets you apart?”

It’s the basis of any good story. And especially if you’re targeting earned media (our forte here), you’re going to need a good – no, a great – answer to that question.

So it is with marketing agencies. In an era when everyone’s an “expert” on social media, how is a brand manager expected to know exactly who to turn to?

The truth is social media is nothing more than a new platform for us to tell and shape our stories. Facebook, being the social media powerhouse that it is, gives us little more than a shiny new interface with which to tell the narratives of our lives – often, these days, from inception to death. In fact, “92 percent of youngsters under age 2 already have a digital footprint, meaning identifiable photos and other personal information has been posted of them online,” according to Huffington Post.

Between photos of the college roommate’s newest dog and best friend’s first baby, how do brands cut through the clutter? Isn’t that what everyone is asking?

The answer is simple, and Facebook has upheld this rule time and time again, with each minute change or shift in its algorithm: Enhance the lives and the digital experiences of your target audience – with stories.

Instagram is a visual storytelling, and Twitter, while becoming increasingly visual, is a short-form storytelling. Facebook is a community storytelling, and Pinterest is a project-based storytelling. I could go on, but the point is, obviously, these sites are simply avenues for stories. Harness your brand’s stories and the stories of your consumers – and leverage social media’s tools to do it.

“I promise you, [the companies] who don’t learn how to tell these stories on today’s platforms are the ones who will go out of business,” said the king of social media, bestselling author Gary Vaynerchuk.

With more than 25 years of award-winning storytelling experience, the JDPR team is uniquely poised to take the social media world by storm on behalf of our clients. That’s our differentiating factor.

Want to learn more about our unique social media strategy? Contact us today.
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Harness Social Media to Brand Yourself for Job Hunt Success

By: Alex Buchart

It is projected that in 2015, 93% of job recruiters will screen potential candidates’ social media profiles. That’s right, 93% of job recruiters. This means that almost every job you will apply to, a potential employer will be Googling you to see how you present yourself to the world. Additionally, 69% of potential employers have rejected a potential candidate because of what they saw on a social networking site.

Here is some food for thought, why not use social media to brand yourself as the perfect candidate for the job rather than as a liability? In fact, 68% of potential employers have hired a candidate because of what they saw on a social networking site.

We hear about how businesses try to create their own unique brands all the time, but what about people branding themselves? Ever found an Instagram or Twitter user you love to follow because they have so many interesting things to say? Well, that is an excellent example of someone branding themself to be a social media success.

Let me give you two examples of successful “branders,” so to speak, that I have observed on Instagram.

kinoyoga

One of the users I follow, a woman named Kino MacGregor , posts detailed yoga poses for each day accompanied by an inspirational caption. Her captions typically involve a message about how much diligence and hard work it has taken her to reach her level of strength – at times even a decade! With 498,000 followers, I began to analyze her success. It’s not just her ability to put her feet behind her head that is fascinating, it is also her ability to bare her vulnerabilities to her followers that ultimately makes her such an inspirational person to follow. She manages to showcase her talents while reminding her followers that it is continuously striving for success after facing failure that makes you stronger.

courtneykerr

The other user I follow is named Courtney Kerr , who uses bright photos and clever captions to capture the interests of her followers. Courtney’s posts are a little more lighthearted, yet she is similar to Kino in that she showcases pieces of herself as well. Typically these pieces are brightly colored jackets and bedazzling jewels, but it is the way she pairs these together that gives her followers a taste for her personality, interests and fears without even truly knowing her. Courtney also uses quotes, moments of sadness as well as joy that give her followers the feeling that she is a real person who has important attributes to show the world.

A few of my takeaways from these Instagram personalities are that in order to brand yourself you must showcase what you love in a clever, tasteful, soul-baring way. These are not just photos of a woman doing yoga on the beach or another posing in a hounds-tooth coat; they are windows into the lives of other people.

I have used these women as inspiration to advertise what I love in a manner of self-expression. In fact, my Instagram is full of dishes I have tried, places I have been and hobbies I love. These past few months I have begun using my Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn as a complete reflection of my resume. Anything and everything I have put in my resume, I have attempted to showcase in some form on my social media. Not only does this prove to employers you are not lying, but it also serves as a portfolio to show my potential employers what I am capable of.

Social media is a wonderful way to brand yourself as a cooking connoisseur, a culture junkie or even a music enthusiast. Let your social media accounts be another voice that speaks truths about who you are as a person and what you can accomplish. Harness the things you care about and put them out there in a way that show your potential employers what you love too!

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Relationships the Classroom Doesn't Teach You About

By: Cary Lynn Nabors

Throughout my public relations classes in college, I’ve constantly heard “PR is about building relationships.” However, one thing the classroom did not teach me is how many relationships there are in a PR firm and what goes into maintaining them. My internship at JDPR has revealed important relationships that I didn’t even know were necessary to keep a PR firm going. How do we go through classes not learning important things like these? I think it speaks to the value of supplementing instruction with internships so you can learn as much as you can.


Vendor Relationships: Sometimes, your client has needs that can’t be met inside the walls of your office, and you have to hire a vendor to assist in areas outside an agency’s core service offerings. This is not a bad thing, but sometimes, especially in a smaller firm, you need to hire artists or videographers to do the best job for your client. When this happens, a PR pro has to take off the vendor hat and wear the client hat, which is a transition I thought PR firms never had to do. Your mentality has to change, the way you talk and how you do your job change because it’s a different relationship. Once you observe these transitions and practice them yourself they make sense, but practice makes perfect and that’s what an internship gives you that the classroom doesn’t.


Nontraditional Media: Who would’ve thought we would be at a point where bloggers can have more of an influence than a media outlet? Blogging has become a huge deal and, at times, PR firms are targeting them as often as news outlets. We briefly mentioned bloggers in my classes, but we never talked about how you have to pitch and approach them differently than traditional media. They do not necessarily view things like a journalist, and you need to pitch them like you would a friend. Once you build those relationships, you can be very candid with them. Should you exclusively pitch nontraditional media? No, but you should not leave them out because they can have a strong influence.


Potential Clients: We never talked in my classes about how PR firms reach new clients. Searching for potential clients is not a one-time deal; it’s an ongoing process that never stops. Interestingly, agencies look for new business without pulling resources away from their existing clients. Hunting for new business is an exciting part of the agency world. There is never a guarantee that you’ll get every client you pitch, but regardless it’s a great way to show the agency’s chops and expand.


Although I learned about these in the workforce and not the classroom, I don’t feel that the classroom isn’t doing a good job. I learned so much in college to help me be a better intern, but the classroom couldn’t teach me everything and I’m thankful for my experience at JDPR to help me grow.

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sysmarketingcouk-2.jpeg
Photo credit: sysmarketing.co.uk
By: Cary Lynn Nabors

Throughout my public relations classes in college, I’ve constantly heard “PR is about building relationships.” However, one thing the classroom did not teach me is how many relationships there are in a PR firm and what goes into maintaining them. My internship at JDPR has revealed important relationships that I didn’t even know were necessary to keep a PR firm going. How do we go through classes not learning important things like these? I think it speaks to the value of supplementing instruction with internships so you can learn as much as you can.


Vendor Relationships: Sometimes, your client has needs that can’t be met inside the walls of your office, and you have to hire a vendor to assist in areas outside an agency’s core service offerings. This is not a bad thing, but sometimes, especially in a smaller firm, you need to hire artists or videographers to do the best job for your client. When this happens, a PR pro has to take off the vendor hat and wear the client hat, which is a transition I thought PR firms never had to do. Your mentality has to change, the way you talk and how you do your job change because it’s a different relationship. Once you observe these transitions and practice them yourself they make sense, but practice makes perfect and that’s what an internship gives you that the classroom doesn’t.


Nontraditional Media: Who would’ve thought we would be at a point where bloggers can have more of an influence than a media outlet? Blogging has become a huge deal and, at times, PR firms are targeting them as often as news outlets. We briefly mentioned bloggers in my classes, but we never talked about how you have to pitch and approach them differently than traditional media. They do not necessarily view things like a journalist, and you need to pitch them like you would a friend. Once you build those relationships, you can be very candid with them. Should you exclusively pitch nontraditional media? No, but you should not leave them out because they can have a strong influence.


Potential Clients: We never talked in my classes about how PR firms reach new clients. Searching for potential clients is not a one-time deal; it’s an ongoing process that never stops. Interestingly, agencies look for new business without pulling resources away from their existing clients. Hunting for new business is an exciting part of the agency world. There is never a guarantee that you’ll get every client you pitch, but regardless it’s a great way to show the agency’s chops and expand.


Although I learned about these in the workforce and not the classroom, I don’t feel that the classroom isn’t doing a good job. I learned so much in college to help me be a better intern, but the classroom couldn’t teach me everything and I’m thankful for my experience at JDPR to help me grow.