Posts tagged with “Relationships”

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Media Relations

What My Rabbit Taught Me About PR


By: Emily Clever

Rabbits are prey animals, and they’re hardwired to be elusive. Bonding with a pet rabbit takes intent, patience, energy and a handful of great ideas.

I’m not trying to degrade the wonderful men and women who follow their hearts as journalists by comparing the two, but regardless of species, building trust and a positive, fruitful relationship looks the same: Be purposeful. Be patient, yet dogged. Stay upbeat. Persevere. Think outside the box, which is an ironic statement intrinsically because it’s so clichéd.

I’ve had my rabbit, Moose, for only a few short months, but she has already managed to teach me so much about the world – and the world of PR. She’s taught me how to think like her (and that hiding behind the couch is not always an option). She’s taught me how far a good meal can go. She’s taught me the importance of being expressive, earnest, curious and respectful.

In this industry, when we reach out to media, we tend to sometimes forget these should-be guiding principles. It’s easy to default into the role of “pushy PR exec with an agenda.” It’s harder to engage, to listen, to ask the right questions, to consider what that journalist is working on or trying to accomplish, to actually be a source – a wellspring – of good ideas instead of a “me too”-type burden.

It’s also easy to chase the rabbit around the apartment and try to force it to like me, whereas it’s harder to learn to appreciate the rabbit and meet it on its level.

“I like to imagine my view of the world is always obscured by a tinted box,” writes Nathan Pyle in what I think is the most brilliant Buzzfeed article of all time. “I can’t see clearly because of this box. It is my own self-interest. Additionally, all of my experiences are like filters that fall into place and further obscure my vision. Everything I view is seen through this very unique set of filters.”

Of course, this is true of everyone … and every creature, too.

Next time you find yourself talking with someone – regardless of whether they’re a journalist, a business partner, a long-time friend, your spouse or your dog – try to see the world from their perspective just for a moment. You’ll be amazed at the results.
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Relationships the Classroom Doesn't Teach You About

By: Cary Lynn Nabors

Throughout my public relations classes in college, I’ve constantly heard “PR is about building relationships.” However, one thing the classroom did not teach me is how many relationships there are in a PR firm and what goes into maintaining them. My internship at JDPR has revealed important relationships that I didn’t even know were necessary to keep a PR firm going. How do we go through classes not learning important things like these? I think it speaks to the value of supplementing instruction with internships so you can learn as much as you can.


Vendor Relationships: Sometimes, your client has needs that can’t be met inside the walls of your office, and you have to hire a vendor to assist in areas outside an agency’s core service offerings. This is not a bad thing, but sometimes, especially in a smaller firm, you need to hire artists or videographers to do the best job for your client. When this happens, a PR pro has to take off the vendor hat and wear the client hat, which is a transition I thought PR firms never had to do. Your mentality has to change, the way you talk and how you do your job change because it’s a different relationship. Once you observe these transitions and practice them yourself they make sense, but practice makes perfect and that’s what an internship gives you that the classroom doesn’t.


Nontraditional Media: Who would’ve thought we would be at a point where bloggers can have more of an influence than a media outlet? Blogging has become a huge deal and, at times, PR firms are targeting them as often as news outlets. We briefly mentioned bloggers in my classes, but we never talked about how you have to pitch and approach them differently than traditional media. They do not necessarily view things like a journalist, and you need to pitch them like you would a friend. Once you build those relationships, you can be very candid with them. Should you exclusively pitch nontraditional media? No, but you should not leave them out because they can have a strong influence.


Potential Clients: We never talked in my classes about how PR firms reach new clients. Searching for potential clients is not a one-time deal; it’s an ongoing process that never stops. Interestingly, agencies look for new business without pulling resources away from their existing clients. Hunting for new business is an exciting part of the agency world. There is never a guarantee that you’ll get every client you pitch, but regardless it’s a great way to show the agency’s chops and expand.


Although I learned about these in the workforce and not the classroom, I don’t feel that the classroom isn’t doing a good job. I learned so much in college to help me be a better intern, but the classroom couldn’t teach me everything and I’m thankful for my experience at JDPR to help me grow.

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Photo credit: sysmarketing.co.uk
By: Cary Lynn Nabors

Throughout my public relations classes in college, I’ve constantly heard “PR is about building relationships.” However, one thing the classroom did not teach me is how many relationships there are in a PR firm and what goes into maintaining them. My internship at JDPR has revealed important relationships that I didn’t even know were necessary to keep a PR firm going. How do we go through classes not learning important things like these? I think it speaks to the value of supplementing instruction with internships so you can learn as much as you can.


Vendor Relationships: Sometimes, your client has needs that can’t be met inside the walls of your office, and you have to hire a vendor to assist in areas outside an agency’s core service offerings. This is not a bad thing, but sometimes, especially in a smaller firm, you need to hire artists or videographers to do the best job for your client. When this happens, a PR pro has to take off the vendor hat and wear the client hat, which is a transition I thought PR firms never had to do. Your mentality has to change, the way you talk and how you do your job change because it’s a different relationship. Once you observe these transitions and practice them yourself they make sense, but practice makes perfect and that’s what an internship gives you that the classroom doesn’t.


Nontraditional Media: Who would’ve thought we would be at a point where bloggers can have more of an influence than a media outlet? Blogging has become a huge deal and, at times, PR firms are targeting them as often as news outlets. We briefly mentioned bloggers in my classes, but we never talked about how you have to pitch and approach them differently than traditional media. They do not necessarily view things like a journalist, and you need to pitch them like you would a friend. Once you build those relationships, you can be very candid with them. Should you exclusively pitch nontraditional media? No, but you should not leave them out because they can have a strong influence.


Potential Clients: We never talked in my classes about how PR firms reach new clients. Searching for potential clients is not a one-time deal; it’s an ongoing process that never stops. Interestingly, agencies look for new business without pulling resources away from their existing clients. Hunting for new business is an exciting part of the agency world. There is never a guarantee that you’ll get every client you pitch, but regardless it’s a great way to show the agency’s chops and expand.


Although I learned about these in the workforce and not the classroom, I don’t feel that the classroom isn’t doing a good job. I learned so much in college to help me be a better intern, but the classroom couldn’t teach me everything and I’m thankful for my experience at JDPR to help me grow.